LearnDesigning for Accessibility

Gill Carson
writes on November 28, 2014

It’s the day after Thanksgiving so we know that all you really want to do is sit and watch a lovely free talk on “Designing for Accessibility” presented by Alastair Campbell and recorded at Generate, London 2014. So here you go.

Alistair believes that if you design accessibility in from the start, you get better results more easily. Yet, even though that premise sounds simple enough, many designers are intimidated by accessible design.

Is it really that simple? We’d love to hear your opinion.

2 Responses to “Designing for Accessibility”

  1. i don’t really think that accessibility is that hard, but even if it were its crucial skill in webdesign, Thanks a lot.

  2. Thank you all so much for this! Accessibility is important, not just making sure your site is following standards but also making sure that the design is accessible. Using large enough font, making sure not to use high/low contrast (with exceptions), and avoiding justified text (dyslexic people have a hard time reading it).

    I work in the Senior Living industry, and believe me when I say that it is the hardest market to design/build for but anything you build that follows the standards for the 55+ demographic works perfectly for everyone else. I’d probably add User Experience to this, although it is usually grouped with Usability. 50% of seniors will give up if they can’t figure out how to use something the first time so making sure that your design promotes a positive and intuitive use is crucial to getting conversions.

    As we become more dependent on the internet for our day to day routines, it becomes increasingly important to make sure everyone can use our sites. Thanks again for sharing this with us, it is a really important topic.

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