IndustrySmiley, the 37signals Customer Support Happiness Report

writes on February 11, 2011

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Following up after our discussion yesterday of 37signals’ office, I had to share the link to their new Customer Support Happiness Report. What an amazing idea! They let anyone come to the site and see how customers are reviewing their interactions. Transparency like this is hard to find, and I’m really excited that they’re sharing the information.

Do you measure happiness with your users and customers? If so, how?

12 Responses to “Smiley, the 37signals Customer Support Happiness Report”

  1. We don’t measure it at Carbonmade as we do all of our support over email. Maybe if/when we move to an internal tool.

    • Anonymous on February 11, 2011 at 7:53 pm said:

      That was part of what made me ask – we use GMail for support and I’m trying to think of unique ways to let users give feedback on the support process without it being too difficult to include the links in the email.

      • I think you get feedback in every email. If you get a “thanks!” then you know you’ve done well and if you get an angry or disgruntled reply then you know you’ve done poorly. It’s as simple as that.

        • Anonymous on February 11, 2011 at 7:57 pm said:

          I think that’s part of it, but I know I’ve told people thanks when I was frustrated before.

          Do you think the smiley face scale gets a more clear answer out of folks. Does monitoring customer happiness based on customer support really even matter that much?

          • That’s the big question, I think. Does it matter? Not so much. Maybe if you’re looking to see if your customer support person is doing a good job or not, but I can see if Mike (our guy) is doing a good job just by watching emails going in and out. That doesn’t scale, though, so I can see why 37signals would change systems. We’ll probably switch to an internal ticket system once email volume doubles.

  2. I’d like it even more if I could mouse-over faces and see the customer’s rational for awarding a happy face or frowny face. “Great service because…” or “Sucky service because…” etc.

    • Anonymous on February 11, 2011 at 7:51 pm said:

      Agreed – it’d be interesting to know what details are attached.

    • Jason Fried on February 12, 2011 at 12:29 am said:

      The comments can have personal account information in them so we’ve decided not to share them.

      • Anonymous on February 12, 2011 at 6:52 pm said:

        Thanks for chiming in, Jason.

        Have you noticed any differences in the smiley face responses of users versus the tone of their emails? Or, put another way, do you feel like the smileys tell you more than just judging and logging email tone would?

  3. Open Company, no Bullshit ^_^

  4. That’s a really great idea, particularly if they extended to offer verbal comments or suggestions. Thanks for sharing Alan.

    Thanks, and Be Happy,

    Gregory S. Barsh, Esq.
    Chief Happiness Officer
    ruHap, The Happiness Company
    Facebook: Join Over 32,000 Fans at

  5. That’s awesome! Every company should make their customer satisfaction ratings public like that. They should make a website user satisfaction app that operates the same way.

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